Exhibition Of Red Brick Art Museum’s Collection: WU Shanzhuan &Inga Svala Thorsdottir with Tony Oursler

Artist Wu Shanzhuan, Inga Svala Thorsdottir, Tony Oursler
Venue Red Brick Art Museum
   
Ticket ¥20.00

Exhibition Of Red Brick Art Museum’s Collection: WU Shanzhuan &Inga Svala Thorsdottir with Tony Oursler

Opening: 3pm, 20 Feb 2016
20 February 2016 to 15 May 2016
Opening Times :Tuesday-Sunday
10:00-17:00 (Closed On Monday)
Add:Hegezhuang,Cuigezhuang Village,Chaoyang District,Beijing
 
From February 20 to May 15, 2016, Red Brick Art Museum presents a collection exhibition entitled “Wu Shanzhuan & Inga Svala Thórsdóttir with Tony Oursler.”
 
Wu Shanzhuan was born in 1960 in Zhoushan, China. He graduated from the Zhejiang Academy of Fine Arts (now China Academy of Art) and the Hochschule für bildende Künste in Hamburg. As one of the leaders of the ’85 New Wave Movement, Wu founded a group called “Red Humor” in 1986 and “Red Humor International” in 1990, breathing new life into Chinese conceptual art by giving humorous and ironic expression to political themes. Inga Svala Thórsdóttir was born in Iceland in 1966.  She graduated from the Icelandic School of Arts and Crafts and the Hochschule für bildende Künste in Hamburg. She founded “Thor’s Daughter’s Pulverization Service” in 1993 and BORG in 1999. Since 1991, Wu and Thórsdóttir have been working and exhibiting collaboratively. They are now based in Hamburg and Shanghai.
 
The exhibition includes paintings and painting installations such as “Thing’s Right(s),” “Color into the Exploitation,” and one of the four parts of “Where is a Meat, There is a Love, Indexed.” In the mid-1990s, Wu and Thórsdóttir shifted from human rights to “thing’s rights.” In the 30 watercolors at this exhibition, “thing’s rights” are extended and become the reference point for human rights. The inscriptions refer to rights that one ought to have in a modern society, like rights to education and property. “Color into the Exploitation” consists of 121 mosaic-like color-blocks that combine to make up two Chinese characters meaning “exploitation,” taking up the whole wall. As the viewer gets closer to the wall or moves away from it, the two characters appear or disappear intermittently, reminding one of various kinds of real yet covert exploitation.
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